In December 2019, EU leaders approved the goal of making the EU climate neutral by 2050. Poland has not been able to commit to this goal at this stage and the European Council will return to this issue in June 2020. EU heads of state and government have recognised the need to ensure a cost-effective, socially equitable and equitable transition, taking into account different national situations. The ECOFIN Council has adopted conclusions on funding for the fight against climate change. The Council stressed the importance of public finances in the fight against climate change. Ministers also confirmed that public climate funding will be cut in the coming years. Contributions from Member States will be announced before the Cop22 meeting. People`s Climate March in New York. More than 400,000 people – including a large WWF delegation – are showing that governments must act urgently to combat climate change, two days before world leaders gather in the city for a UN-led summit on the issue.

(a) to keep the global average temperature increase well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to continue efforts to limit the increase in temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the potential to significantly reduce the risks and effects of climate change; In an effort to “significantly reduce the risks and effects of climate change,” the agreement calls for the average increase in global temperature over this century to be well below 2 degrees Celsius, while continuing efforts to limit temperature rise to 1.5 degrees. It also calls on countries to commit as quickly as possible to comparing global greenhouse gas emissions and to become carbon neutral by the second half of this century. To achieve these goals, 186 countries – responsible for more than 90% of global emissions – presented CO2 reduction targets prior to the Paris conference, known as “determined national contributions” (INDC). These targets set out the commitments made by each country to reduce emissions until 2025 or 2030, including macroeconomic targets for co2 reduction and individual commitments of some 2,250 cities and 2,025 companies. The EU and its member states are among the nearly 190 parties to the Paris Agreement. The EU formally ratified the agreement on 5 October 2016, allowing it to enter into force on 4 November 2016. In order for the agreement to enter into force, at least 55 countries representing at least 55% of global emissions had to file their ratification instruments. The EU and its member states are individually responsible for ratifying the Paris Agreement.

There was a strong preference for the EU and its 28 Member States to simultaneously table their ratification instruments to ensure that neither the EU nor its Member States commit to commitments that belong exclusively to the other[71] and there was concern that there was a disagreement on each Member State`s share of the EU-wide reduction target. just as Britain`s vote to leave the EU could delay the Paris pact. [72] However, on 4 October 2016, the European Parliament approved the ratification of the Paris Agreement[60] and the EU tabled its ratification instruments on 5 October 2016 with several EU Member States. [72] As soon as the European Parliament gives the go-ahead, the final decision will be formally adopted by the Council.